Blog #1: Exfoliation

What exactly is exfoliate?

Exfoliation is the process of removing dead skin cells from the surface of the skin through either chemical or mechanical methods. 
The act of exfoliating dates back to ancient Egypt where sour milk, which contains lactic acid, was used as a chemical exfoliant. Also, popular abrasives and other minerals such as alabaster particles, sand and aloe vera plant were used by ancient Egyptians to produce exfoliation scrubs.

The act of exfoliating dates back to ancient Egypt where sour milk, which contains lactic acid, was used as a chemical exfoliant. Also, popular abrasives and other minerals such as alabaster particles, sand and aloe vera plant were used by ancient Egyptians to produce exfoliation scrubs.

The science behind exfoliation.
Desquamation, the Latin “desquamare” meaning to scrape the scales off a fish, is the actual process of shedding the outer layers of the skin.

As we age, the glue–like intercellular cement holding the cells together becomes thicker. This results in a build up in the layers of skin cells making the skin sloughing process more difficult to accomplish.  Leaving you with skin that has a thicker, less-toned appearance.

This process can be influenced by the environment, hormones (estrogens, androgens, and epidermal growth factor), and vitamin deficiencies (A and D). With the impact of all these factors on the desquamation process, the importance of skin exfoliation is clear. By eliminating the build up of dead and deranged skin cells (stratum corneum), regeneration of new skin cells is stimulated, resulting in an improved appearance, tone, and feel of the skin. (http://hbmag.com/exfoliation/)

Sugar and salts found in facial and body scrubs are one of the most common and effective forms of exfoliations. Exfoliating your entire body can help prevent body acne in many places below your neck, such as the chest, back and arms. It also might help you avoid ingrown hairs by preventing dead skin cells from plugging up follicles where you've shaved or waxed. Exfoliation can help even out skin tone and keep your skin hydrated and soft.
Exfoliating removes the surface layer of dead cells and allows for deeper penetration of your body butters.

How often should you exfoliate?
Health experts say that you can exfoliate your body at least twice a week. For most, exfoliating twice a week is sufficient. However,
  • LESS: older skin may tends to be more delicate and requires less exfoliating. 
  • MORE: Oily skin could benefit from exfoliating more often than their dry-skinned sisters.
  • MORE: Warm weather increases perspiration and oil production, leading to speedier accumulation of dead cells
  • MORE: Oily skin makes it hard for complexion-dimming dead cells to make their exit. "Starting in your 30s, your skin can look dull and ashen because skin cells renew themselves more slowly than they did when you were younger," says Debra Jaliman, M.D., a clinical instructor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

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dŌSA's Exfoliating Scrub has been formulated with organic sugars, butters and penetrating oils that not only help your body get rid of dead skin cells but it also traps and seals in moisture.  This collection contains the power antioxidant Vitamin E and is infused with essential oils and dŌSA's signature fragrances that leave you with delightfully scented skin.

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